Senator Bernie Sanders’ Appeal to Traditional (1945-1981) American Values

There haven’t been too many real interviews with Bernie Sanders this election season. Outside of his regular appearances with Thom Hartmann on their long-standing “Brunch with Bernie” series, when the MSM do deign to have him on, at around a hundredth of the time allotted to a certain real estate mogul and reality TV star, he’s either constantly marginalized or asked an endless stream of questions about Trump and Clinton, the two world famous candidates who fuel the networks’ ratings, instead of allowed to have serious policy discussions.

So it was a pleasure to see him appear on The Young Turks program the other day, even if the questions didn’t often stray from the current state of the race. I wish he could have stayed for an hour. Neither Cenk, nor the rest of us, would have minded at all.

Sanders hit a big trifecta this weekend, winning in Washington, Alaska and Hawaii by enormous margins, making it five contests in a row now where he’s won almost every single county precinct in those elections.

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Senate Defeats the Latest Industry Effort to Block GMO Food Labeling

Good news in the ongoing fight for consumers’ right to know! By a slim 1-vote margin, the bill was stopped in its tracks. Thanks to the efforts of numerous consumer, health and anti-GMO groups, their communities and their state representatives.

The Center for Food Safety reports:

Defeat of the “DARK Act” is Major Victory for America’s Right to Know

Today the Deny Americans the Right to Know (DARK) Act failed to garner enough votes for cloture by a vote of 49-48, effectively defeating the bill.  The bill introduced by Senator Roberts (R-KS) faced bi-partisan rejection.  The bill would have preempted the genetically engineered food labeling laws in Vermont, Connecticut, Maine and Alaska.  In its place it would have put a voluntary labeling scheme that relies primarily on QR codes, websites and call in numbers to inform consumers about the presence of GMOs.

“The defeat of the DARK Act is a major victory for the food movement and America’s right to know,” said Andrew Kimbrell, Executive Director of the Center for Food Safety. “It also is an important victory for Democracy over the attempt of corporate interests to keep Americans in the Dark about the foods they buy and feed their families.” Kimbrell concluded.  Continue reading

Seasonal Dependency

It’s a relatively tough existence being made of water. Water in of itself is most likely used to the drill; a liquid drop, a collective puddle or a cumulative roaring ocean in moderate climes, converting to steam and evaporation in hot and dry temperatures, and taking on solid form as snow and ice in the bitter cold. But what about lifeforms made up primarily of water? Approximately 60% of an adult human is made up of that hydrogen/oxygen combo, and 3/4 of the surface of our planet is water. And none would disagree that both humans and the Earth are having a bit of a tough go of it, although much of that rests on the former.

But imagine being made of 98.5% water (plus a combined 1.5% scarf, carrot and charcoal) and being dependent on both a willing human and a suitable temperature range to even exist. Toss in the fact that they’re an annual species whose life expectancy only spans a single season, and that there is no accounting for taste when mom only lets you use the household’s most expendable scarf to adorn your snow creation, and you can see why snowmen and snowwomen across the country have a bit of the blues.

Cartoon by DCMunford.

DM end sno-man

 

 

Could 30% of the Water on Earth Predate the Solar System?!

A September 2014 study concludes that much of the water on Earth predates the solar system itself. Say what? Here’s the L.A. Times’ Science section article with more:

Some of the water molecules in your drinking glass were created more than 4.5 billion years ago, according to new research. That makes them older than the Earth, older than the solar system — even older than the sun itself.

In a study published Thursday in Science, researchers say the distinct chemical signature of the water on Earth and throughout the solar system could occur only if some of that water formed before the swirling disk of dust and gas gave birth to the planets, moons, comets and asteroids.

This primordial water makes up 30% to 50% of the water on Earth, the researchers estimate.

“It’s pretty amazing that a significant fraction of water on Earth predates the sun and the solar system,” said study leader Ilse Cleeves, an astronomer at the University of Michigan.